“Amid Shortages, a Surplus of Hope” by Ryu Murakami /『危機的状況の中の希望』村上龍

I appreciate you so much for your concern about Japan. I would like you all over the world to read this essay written recently by Ryu Murakami.

————————————————————————————————————————————

“ADMID SHORTAGES, A SURPLUS OF HOPE”
By RYU MURAKAMI

Published: March 16, 2011

in Yokohama, Japan

I SET out from my home in the port city of Yokohama early in the afternoon last Friday, and shortly before 3 p.m. I checked into my hotel in the Shinjuku neighborhood of Tokyo. I usually spend three or four days a week there to write, gather material and take care of other business.

The earthquake hit just as I entered my room. Thinking I might end up trapped beneath rubble, I grabbed a container of water, a carton of cookies and a bottle of brandy and dived beneath the sturdily built writing desk. Now that I think about it, I don’t suppose there would have been time to savor a last taste of brandy if the 30-story hotel had fallen down around me. But taking even this much of a countermeasure kept sheer panic at bay.

Before long an emergency announcement came over the P.A. system: “This hotel is constructed to be absolutely earthquake-proof. There is no danger of the building collapsing. Please do not attempt to leave the hotel.” This was repeated several times. At first I wondered if it was true. Wasn’t the management merely trying to keep people calm?

And it was then that, without really thinking about it, I adopted my fundamental stance toward this disaster: For the present, at least, I would trust the words of people and organizations with better information and more knowledge of the situation than I. I decided to believe the building wouldn’t fall. And it didn’t.

The Japanese are often said to abide faithfully by the rules of the “group” and to be adept at forming cooperative systems in the face of great adversity. That would be hard to deny today. Valiant rescue and relief efforts continue nonstop, and no looting has been reported.

Away from the eyes of the group, however, we also have a tendency to behave egoistically — almost as if in rebellion. And we are experiencing that too: Necessities like rice and water and bread have disappeared from supermarkets and convenience stores. Gas stations are out of fuel. There is panic buying and hoarding. Loyalty to the group is being tested.

At present, though, our greatest concern is the crisis at the nuclear reactors in Fukushima. There is a mass of confused and conflicting information. Some say the situation is worse than Three Mile Island, but not as bad as Chernobyl; others say that winds carrying radioactive iodine are headed for Tokyo, and that everyone should remain indoors and eat lots of kelp, which contains plenty of safe iodine, which helps prevent the absorbtion of the radioactive element. An American friend advised me to flee to western Japan.

Some people are leaving Tokyo, but most remain. “I have to work,” some say. “I have my friends here, and my pets.” Others reason, “Even if it becomes a Chernobyl-class catastrophe, Fukushima is 170 miles from Tokyo.”

My parents are in western Japan, in Kyushu, but I don’t plan to flee there. I want to remain here, side by side with my family and friends and all the victims of the disaster. I want to somehow lend them courage, just as they are lending courage to me.

And, for now, I want to continue the stance I took in my hotel room: I will trust the words of better-informed people and organizations, especially scientists, doctors and engineers whom I read online. Their opinions and judgments do not receive wide news coverage. But the information is objective and accurate, and I trust it more than anything else I hear.

Ten years ago I wrote a novel in which a middle-school student, delivering a speech before Parliament, says: “This country has everything. You can find whatever you want here. The only thing you can’t find is hope.”

One might say the opposite today: evacuation centers are facing serious shortages of food, water and medicine; there are shortages of goods and power in the Tokyo area as well. Our way of life is threatened, and the government and utility companies have not responded adequately.

But for all we’ve lost, hope is in fact one thing we Japanese have regained. The great earthquake and tsunami have robbed us of many lives and resources. But we who were so intoxicated with our own prosperity have once again planted the seed of hope. So I choose to believe.

Ryu Murakami is the author of “Popular Hits of the Showa Era.” This article was translated by Ralph F. McCarthy from the Japanese.

NY TIMES

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/17/opinion/17Murakami.html?_r=1

————————————————————————————————————————————

below is in Japanese.

「危機的状況の中の希望」

著 者:村上龍

出版日:2011年3月16日

翻 訳:タイムアウト東京編集部

先週の金曜、港町・横浜にある我が家を出て、午後3時前、いつも行く新宿のホテルにチェックインした。普段から私はここに週3~4日滞在し執筆活動やその他の仕事をしている。

部屋に入ってすぐに地震が起きた。瓦礫の下敷きになると判断し、とっさに水とクッキー、ブランデーのボトルをつかんで頑丈な机の下にもぐりこんだ。今にして思えば、高層30階建てのビルの下敷きになったらブランデーを楽しむどころではないのだが。だが、この行動によってパニックに陥らずにすんだ。

すぐに館内放送で地震警報が流れた。「このホテルは最強度の耐震構造で建設されており、建物が損傷することはありません。ホテルを出ないでください」という放送が、何度かにわたって流された。最初は私も多少懐疑的だった。ホテル側がゲストを安心させようとしているだけではないのかと。

だが、このとき私は直感的に、この地震に対する根本的なスタンスを決めた。少なくとも今この時点では、私よりも状況に通じている人々や機関からの情報を信頼すべきだ。だからこの建物も崩壊しないと信じる、と。そして、建物は崩壊しなかった。

日本人は元来“集団”のルールを信頼し、逆境においては、速やかに協力体制を組織することに優れているといわれてきた。それがいま証明されている。勇猛果敢な復興および救助活動は休みなく続けられ、略奪も起きていない。

しかし集団の目の届かないところでは、我々は自己中心になる。まるで体制に反逆するかのように。そしてそれは実際に起こっている。米やパン、水といった必需品がスーパーの棚から消えた。ガソリンスタンドは枯渇状態だ。品薄状態へのパニックが一時的な買いだめを引き起こしている。集団への忠誠心は試練のときを迎えている。

現時点での最大の不安は福島の原発だ。情報は混乱し、相違している。スリーマイル島の事故より悪い状態だがチェルノブイリよりはましだという説もあれば、放射線ヨードを含んだ風が東京に飛んできているので屋内退避してヨウ素を含む海藻を食べれば放射能の吸収度が抑えられるという説もある。そして、アメリカの友人は西へ逃げろと忠告してきた。

東京を離れる人も多いが、残る人も多い。彼らは「仕事があるから」という。「友達もいるし、ペットもいる」、他にも「チェルノブイリのような壊滅的な状態になっても、福島は東京から170マイルも離れているから大丈夫だ」という人もいる。

私の両親は東京より西にある九州にいるが、私はそこに避難するつもりはない。家族や友人、被災した人々とここに残りたい。残って、彼らを勇気づけたい。彼らが私に勇気をくれているように。

今この時点で、私は新宿のホテルの一室で決心したスタンスを守るつもりでいる。私よりも専門知識の高いソースからの発表、特にインターネットで読んだ科学者や医者、技術者の情報を信じる。彼らの意見や分析はニュースではあまり取り上げられないが、情報は冷静かつ客観的で、正確であり、なによりも信じるに値する。

私が10年前に書いた小説には、中学生が国会でスピーチする場面がある。「この国には何でもある。本当にいろいろなものがあります。だが、希望だけがない」と。

今は逆のことが起きている。避難所では食料、水、薬品不足が深刻化している。東京も物や電力が不足している。生活そのものが脅かされており、政府や電力会社は対応が遅れている。

だが、全てを失った日本が得たものは、希望だ。大地震と津波は、私たちの仲間と資源を根こそぎ奪っていった。だが、富に心を奪われていた我々のなかに希望の種を植え付けた。だから私は信じていく。

タイムアウト東京

http://www.timeout.jp/ja/tokyo/feature/2581

コメントを残す